Unlike certain Emperors’ flair for wickedness, however, the Diviner takes no pleasure in being evil. Indeed, in a 2022 interview with the website The Beat, Noble points out that, like most characters described as “villains” in “Star Trek,” the Diviner is actually working to achieve a goal he believes to be righteous. This is a lesson he learned playing a seemingly villainous character on “Fringe.” No one, he feels, wakes up aiming to be villainous. They merely have different values than the heroes. It’s the secret to believably playing a sinister person. When asked just how evil the Diviner was, Noble was diplomatic, pointing out that it was all a matter of perspective. He said:

“It depends if you’re talking his internal truth, or what appears to be his truth. I guess we’re talking what appears to be his truth. His own internal truth: pure as the driven snow — I believe that it is. Obsessively so. But the audience has probably thought, ‘Well, he’s a grumpy old man.’ [Diviner’s voice] ‘A grumpy old fellow.’ With a big, deep voice. Perception would be that he’s a bad one.”

Some of the more interesting characters throughout “Star Trek” have a hazy or inverted moral code. On “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine,” the Cardassian Garak (Andrew Robinson) once declared that lies and propaganda are vital for society to function. Quark (Armin Shimerman) from the same show is deeply principled, and only happens to devote his life to acquisition and wealth. Noble understands that notion. He even understands that the Diviner has a deep-seated talent for obfuscation, and for manipulation. The Diviner has no compunction about plying these talents.

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